Free Download PDF Ballparks: A Journey Through the Fields of the Past, Present, and Future


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If you love baseball and the venerable stadiums its played in, you need this definitive history and guide to Major League ballparks of the past, present, and future.

With a tear-out checklist to mark ballparks you’ve visited and those on your bucket list, Ballparks takes you inside the intriguing histories of every park in the Major Leagues, with hundreds of photos, stories, and stats about:
 

  • Storied parks like Wrigley Field, Fenway Park, and Dodger Stadium
  • Fan favorites AT&T Park, Camden Yards, PNC Park, Safeco Field, and so much more
  • Forgotten treasures like Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Sportsman’s Park in St. Louis, and all five parks of the Detroit Tigers
  • New stadiums like the Atlanta Braves’ SunTrust Park, the Minneapolis Twins’ Target Field, and New York’s Yankee Stadium and Citifield
  • More than 40 other major league parks that tell the story of the national pastime through the lens of the fields the players call home

No baseball fan’s collection is complete without this up-to-date tome.


From the Publisher

Photo credit - Houston Public LibraryPhoto credit - Houston Public Library

The Brooklyn Tip-Tops (in white) partake in Opening Day festivities with the Buffalo Bisons (in black) before playing their first home game at Brooklyn’s Washington Park in 1914.

Contents from Ballparks: A Journey Through the Fields of the Past, Present, and Future

Veteran Stadium - Philadelphia Phillies 1971-2003

Veteran Stadium - Philadelphia Phillies 1971-2003

Shea Stadium - New York Mets 1694-2008

Shea Stadium - New York Mets 1694-2008

Turner Field - Atlanta Braves 1997-2016

Turner Field - Atlanta Braves 1997-2016

Veterans Stadium – Philadelphia Phillies 1971-2003

With the neglected Connie Mack Stadium falling apart in its final seasons, the Philadelphia Phillies were happy in 1971 to move into government-funded stadium built to house them and the Philadelphia Eagles. Unfortunately, Veterans Stadium turned out to be even more of a disaster than most of its multipurpose brethren. Most seats were far removed from the action, creating a cold and impersonal environment, and the nosebleed section was even higher up than at most modern superstadiums.

Shea Stadium – New York Mets 1694-2008

Few ballparks have squeezed as much action into so short a lifetime as Shea Stadium. In its four and a half decades, the giant ballpark in Flushing Meadows hosted a World’s Fair, a mass given by Pope John Paul II, and concerts by the Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and Billy Joel. In baseball, Shea housed the best of teams (the 1986 Mets), the worst of teams (the mid-1960s Mets), and everything in between. But it’s best remembered as the backdrop for the 1969 Mets, perhaps the most lovable and unlikely World Series champion of all time.

Turner Field – Atlanta Braves 1997-2016

When it comes to building ballparks, following the lead of the Montreal Expos is usually not a good idea. But that’s what Atlanta did in 1996, taking a stadium built for the Olympics—which otherwise would have stood as a white elephant—and retrofitting it for baseball. This move had backfired on the Expos in 1976, when Stade Olympique turned out to be not only a bad stadium but also a boondoggle of staggering proportions. Atlanta learned from Montreal’s mistakes, though, and Centennial Olympic Stadium was transformed into an enjoyable, if generic, place to watch a baseball game.

Highlighted Images from Ballparks: A Journey Through the Fields of the Past, Present, and Future

Willie Mays races catch Game 1 1954 World Series. read 483 feet Vic Wertz’s Mays’s glove

Willie Mays races catch Game 1 1954 World Series. read 483 feet Vic Wertz’s Mays’s glove

Satchel Paige warms up at Yankee Stadium on May 11, 1941, as

Satchel Paige warms up at Yankee Stadium on May 11, 1941, as

Shohei Ohtani

Shohei Ohtani

Willie Mays races back to make what many thought an impossible catch in Game 1 of the 1954 World Series. The distance marker painted on the wall in deepest center field read 483 feet, so Vic Wertz’s drive probably traveled about 450 feet before dropping into Mays’s glove for an out. The play happened with two runners on base, so the catch played a huge role in New York’s eventual 5-2 win. This image also shows a well-known Polo Grounds landmark, the gravestone-like marker on the field of play honoring Eddie Grant, a former Giants infielder who died while rescuing soldiers under his command in the Argonne Forest during World War I.

Satchel Paige warms up at Yankee Stadium on May 11, 1941, as another Hall of Fame pitcher, Pete Alexander, looks on. Paige, signed by the New York Black Yankees for this game only, arrived in town ‘driving a long car, squiring a pretty girl, and ‘thinking about’ signing a Black Yankee contract’, one reporter wrote. Paige’s appearance drew a crowd of more than 20,000—a higher attendance than eight of the nine MLB games played that day—and Mayor Fiorello La Guardia threw out the first pitch. Paige pitched a complete game victory over the Philadelphia Stars, limiting them to five hits.

Shohei Ohtani

Before the 2018 season, the Angels scored a coup when they landed Shohei Ohtani, the Japanese wunderkind who was one of the most sought-after free agents in baseball history. A rare two-way player, the twenty-three-year-old Ohtani enjoyed perhaps the best week of any Angels player ever in early April 2018. He won two games on the mound, including a near-perfect game, while also homering in three straight games as designated hitter.

Publisher‏:‎Chartwell Books; Illustrated edition (October 16, 2018)
Language‏:‎English
Hardcover‏:‎304 pages
ISBN-10‏:‎0785836160
ISBN-13‏:‎978-0785836162
Item Weight‏:‎4.35 pounds
Dimensions‏:‎10.1 x 1.15 x 12.3 inches
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